Week 38: SFX

While we still have leaves on the trees, I decided to try shooting some of the rolls of Ilford SFX200.  I had previously used this film stock, but with no filter on my camera.  It is considered a ‘near-IR’ film, so I bit the bullet and bought a Hoyo R72 UV filter.  Since I didn’t feel like using a tripod, I loaded up my Yashica Mat-124G.  Because it is a twin-lens relfex, I could put the R72 filter on the taking lens and still easily focus with the focusing lens.  If I was shooting with a normal SLR, I’d either have to guesstimate focus (hyper-focus) or take the filter on and off.  A rangefinder is probably another good option for more spontaneous shots with this filter/film combination.

For this week I shot two rolls, one a test roll around my house getting the necessary filter factor.  Hoyo does not publish a filter factor for this filter, and they claim it changes with different films and applications.  I found 3 or 3 1/2 stops seemed to work pretty well.  4 Stops ended up being a little dark.  The other roll I roamed around my current city (Norwich) and my hometown (Colchester) looking for interesting subjects. Both rolls developed in Perceptol and all scans by my Epson V700.

So first the contact sheet I made of the test roll, and a small print I made of my favorite shot on the roll.  Ilford multigrade RC paper, both with Ilford #2 contrast filter, Dektol developer.

Contact

Contact

Small Print

Small Print

And the scans of the negatives.

Reach

Reach

This next pair are from an old train station that has been turned into an antiques store.  The train bed itself has been turned into a bike/walk path.  Originally this was a spur of the Airline Rail, a late 1800s-1900s venture that attempted to cut down on NYC to Boston transit.  Rather than following the shoreline, it basically goes right along a straight line from NY to Boston.  Unfortunately, this part of the state is quite hilly compared to the shore, so the trains had to go slower to navigate some of the bends, and thus offered no real time savings.  It did, however, open up the local region to tourists coming from NYC, so a lot of resorts sprung up along the rail.  At one time, the rail had the two of the longest rail viaducts in the country, the Lyman and Riappolo Viaducts.  As a teen/young adult, we used to go swimming at the Lyman Viaduct, and would jump off the 20 ft+ (~6m) cement tunnels that allowed the creek to flow under the filled in viaduct.  I’m surprised I am still alive considering how many crazy things we did. At some point, I’ll have to go shooting over there, though I think they have chain-link fences to stop anyone from jumping in the creek.

Old train station, cropped

Old train station, cropped

Airline Station

Airline Station

Gazebo

Gazebo

The local high school (secondary school, senior school), Norwich Free Academy.  It looks like a small college campus and reflects the wealth of a by-gone era for my city.

Norwich Free Academy

Norwich Free Academy

Road

Road

I quite enjoyed the results from this combination of camera, filter and film.

8 thoughts on “Week 38: SFX

  1. Excellent results. Hey, you’re right, a TLR is perfect for IR work. I may have to try this soon in my new Yashica D. I used to shoot a bit of Kodak High Speed IR in 35mm back in the 90’s. Bracketing was the name of the game, as it was often wildly unpredictable. Oh, BTW, remember having to use a different focus reference point on my SLR lenses. Did you have to alter from what you determined in the finder?

    Like

  2. Thanks! I tried a few low DoF shots and the focus was off a little, but no generally with the TLR and its magnifying loupe, I get very sharp focus–better than most of my SLRs. I love shooting with it, but still struggle a little getting exact horizons. I sometimes have to rotate my scans 0.5-1 degree.

    Like

    • Thank you, I wasn’t sure how they would turn out since I didn’t have time to develop the test roll before my target roll. But Fall is upon us and leaves are dropping quickly…

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s