Week 43: Comstock, Trichrome round 2

I am posting a little out of order because some of my rolls are E-6, and my local developing store has closed.  Well, more accurate, they closed and moved to New Hampshire, which is no longer local.  I had used them a number of times on this project, especially before I got comfortable doing C-41 processing, and it was nice to be able to just swing by there on my way to work, drop off my film and pick it up the next day or a few days later.

Anyway, for this week I went down to a local landmark I’ve shot a few times in this project, but with the thought of capturing the last of the Fall colors, and trying out the trichrome technique again.  In case you missed my earlier post on this, trichromes are 3 B&W photos taken with red, green and blue filters and then overlayed to get a final color image.  I do this in GIMP and it is fairly simple.  Each image is a separate layer in the final, and you colorize with the corresponding filter you used to shoot the image.

Getting things aligned was more tricky this time because I was dealing with more vegetation.  I also think my choice of camera (Yashica Mat 124G) worked against me some as the focal length results in some distortion on the edges of the negatives and getting that distortion to align perfectly after shooting and scanning proved a little troublesome.  But, the results are certainly unique.  I shot these with Kodak TMax-100, developed in Ilford DD-X for 7 minutes.

I also brought along my Olympus OM-2n loaded with Kodak Hawkeye.  I wasn’t all that impressed with my previous results from this film, and despite people saying it was like ‘high-speed’ Ektar, it just looked like high-speed blah.  So I shot at a lower ISO (250) rather than the box speed of 400.  I still am not all that thrilled with the colors.  I developed this with a fresh Jobo C-41 press kit, so I know it wasn’t because the developer was on its last legs.

I took the trichrome shots and then took a shot with the OM-2n, just for comparison sake.  The single shots will obviously be sharper, but you can also see the distortion/alignment issues in this first shot (the multiple-trunk small tree in the lower right).  Neither look like what my eye saw in terms of color, but I like the trichrome look better.

Trichrome

Trichrome

Hawkeye, cropped

Hawkeye, cropped

This one is kind of neat because the clouds are more prominent, and there was a young family down by the river with the kids running around between shots.  So they show up as different colors because of the nature of the trichrome process.

Trichrome

Trichrome

Hawkeye, cropped

Hawkeye, cropped

I messed up one of my trichrome shots (completely underexposed the green), but I knew I made the mistake as I was shooting.  But still it limited me to 3 potential trichromes and the third, looking up the river from the window in the bridge, just had too many alignment issues and ended up looking yucky, so I scrapped it.  But I did take a few regular b&w shots, this one with a red filter looking down river into the sun.  I adjusted it down to what I wanted when i took it.  This might make for a fun darkroom printing project to play with dodging and burning.

TMax, red filter

TMax, red filter

And I also wandered around taking shots with the Olympus and Hawkeye.

Red

Red

Trees

Trees

Fly fishing

Fly fishing

I’ll probably try the trichrome technique a few more times before the year is out, but I will most likely try it with a different camera, perhaps my Fujica GW690.

2 thoughts on “Week 43: Comstock, Trichrome round 2

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